Home Bali Bengkala Village “Kolok” Dancers Make Proud – Bali Travel News

Bengkala Village “Kolok” Dancers Make Proud – Bali Travel News

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Even though they are classified as disabled (kolok/deaf-mute), two girls from Bengkala Village, Kubuaddan District, Buleleng, Bali are able to express the movements of the Puspa Arum Bengala Dance. They performed with four normal girls who are also native to Bengkala Village in the implementation of the Community Service Program held by the Indonesian Art Institute (ISI) Denpasar, Tuesday (14/9). They appear excited and full of expression. Interestingly, these girls are not only good at performing dance, but also good at makeup.

These two disabled girls appear with almost perfect dance and make-up techniques. It was certainly a long process, so that the girls in the village were able to perform optimally. “The guidance for Puspa Arum Dance is carried out through several stages, such as making a dance and make-up training schedule, providing dance technique training, compiling a performance structure, scheduling make-up training and conducting trials of training results, evaluation, and reflection,” said the Head of the Service Program. To the Community Dr. Ida Ayu Trisnawati, SST., M.Sc.

The Puspa Arum Bengkala dance performed is the identity of the Bengkala kolok community created by Ida Ayu Trisnawati in 2018 in the Science and Technology Service Forum for the Community (FLIPMAS), which is Pertamina’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) program. This dance serves as a welcoming dance to people who come to Bengkala Village which depicts fragrant flowers from Bengkala Village. In the community service, Ayu Trisnawati was accompanied by Sulistyani, S.Kar., M.Si who was in charge of providing makeup training and Gede Basuyoga Prabhawita, S.Sn., M.Sn served in the documentation.

This make-up training is given, so that they can prepare themselves independently when performing. While the documentation is in the form of video, it will be uploaded on YouTube and then published. That way, Bengkala Village is not only famous for Janger Kolok Bengkala, but is also known for its Baris Bebila Dance, the Anguci Starling Dance where all dancers are kolok, and has the newest Puspa Arum Bengkala Dance. The Baris Bebila Dance, and the Anguci Starling Dance are also the results of Ida Ayu Trisnawati’s previously arranged creations.

Basic dance makeup training is provided, starting with introducing make-up tools and materials. It is carried out on the sidelines of a dance break, especially after finishing practice. Various types of tools and makeup are practiced in daily life and when dancing. Starting from cleaning your face, using a powder base until you are ready to apply makeup. Dancers are trained to apply makeup to form facial characters to make them more attractive when dancing. Then eyebrow makeup to shape the eyebrows according to the character of the dance being staged, lip makeup to shape the lips and color selection to support the performance, hair makeup trains the hair metas so that it is neat and in accordance with the character of the dance being staged.

The ISI Denpasar Dance Lecturer explained that the obstacles faced during the implementation of this activity were sign language, very poor dancing skills, and restrictions on activities due to the pandemic. “We are looking for translators to communicate with them. We also apply a reverse training model. If in general, dancers follow the musicians, especially for these disabled dancers, the musicians follow the dancers’ movements. We also use an online training model with video,” he explained.

The dance technique is done by imitation, the kolok dancer imitates directly what is done by the trainer. The technique used for effective training must be more specific because the target dancers are the kolok community. “We hope that this activity will have an impact on empowering groups of people with disabilities/kolok in Bengkala village, especially in the field of dancing. In the long term, we hope that this activity can become one of the potentials that will continue to be maximized to improve the welfare of the community,” he hoped. (BTN/bud)

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